Creators on Instagram and other platforms made nearly $7 billion, study says

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Creators in the U.S. are earning more than ever on internet platforms like Instagram, YouTube, and Tumblr — nearly $7 billion, according to a new study.

The sprawling 97-page report by the Re:Create Coalition analyzes how many people in the U.S. are creating online content, where in the country they’re located, and how much they are earning. According to the study, nearly 17 million Americans earned an estimated $6.8 billion across nine internet platforms in 2017.

The Re:Create Coalition, a group which advocates for fair use and balanced copyright law, conducted the research in order to update its previous findings from 2016 on what it calls “America’s New Creative Economy.” The most recent report found a nearly $1 billion increase in earnings and more than 2.4 million additional creators over the one-year period between studies.  Read more…

More about Youtube, Instagram, Tumblr, Creators, and Tech

https://mashable.com/article/instagram-twitch-users-make-money/

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5 of the Best Linux Distros for Raspberry Pi

best-raspberry-pi-distros-featured.jpgThe Raspberry Pi debuted in 2012, and since then the tiny computer and its successors have powered countless projects. While you can install regular Ubuntu on a Raspberry Pi, there are plenty of more specialized Linux distributions available. This list includes options that can handle everything from general computing to creating a tiny portable arcade. 1. Raspbian If you’re looking for a good place to start, Raspbian is it. It’s the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s official supported operating system, so you’ll find plenty of documentation. It also has a lot of software installed so you can get started right away. Raspbian, as the name implies,… Read more

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https://www.maketecheasier.com/best-linux-distros-raspberry-pi/

This guy found a working 30-year-old Apple IIe in his parents’ attic, and wow those were simpler times

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There are objects in our lives that will forever be tied to childhood: a favorite toy, for example, or the first chapter book that you read and truly connected with. 

For most of us, these items are forever lost — long ago consigned to the dustbin of Goodwill. Not so for Professor John Pfaff, who on Feb. 16 shared with the world a discovery that blasted him straight to his personal past: a working 30-year-old Apple IIe computer. 

“Oh. My. God,” he tweeted. “An Apple IIe. Sat in my parents’ attic for years. Decades. And it works.”

More about Apple, Tech, and Consumer Tech

https://mashable.com/article/guy-finds-working-apple-iie/

How to Use Reverse SSH Tunnel to Allow External Connections to Your PC

ssh-reverse-featured-min.jpgIf you’re lucky enough that your Internet Service Provider (ISP) gives you a dedicated IP address, you can set up a home server and make it available to the Internet by adding a few port forwarding rules to your router. But if your ISP makes you share that IP with your neighbors, then port forwarding won’t help. Other providers simply block incoming connections through firewall rules. You can bypass all of these restrictions with the help of a virtual private server. Anything will work, even if it has less than 512MB of RAM, as all it has to do is redirect network traffic. This is very light on… Read more

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https://www.maketecheasier.com/reverse-ssh-tunnel-allow-external-connections/

Apple sticking with Lightning over USB-C on next iPhone: report

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The next generation of iPhones may come equipped with all sorts of new cutting-edge features, but it will still be lagging behind the rest of the mobile world in one major aspect, according to a new report.

Apple will once again pass on USB-C port and instead equip the 2019 iPhone model with a Lightning port, according to Japanese tech site Macotakara. The report, which was first spotted by 9to5Mac, also states that the next iPhone will continue to be bundled with a USB-A charger. 

The reason this comes as a surprise to many is because the iPhone remains one of the last holdouts in the smartphone world, as most modern phones (especially Android devices) have embraced the new USB-C port for charging and data transfer.  Read more…

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https://mashable.com/article/apple-lightning-port-usbc-2019-iphone/

Too few cybersecurity professionals is a gigantic problem for 2019

Robert Ackerman Jr.
Contributor

Robert Ackerman Jr. is the founder and a managing director of AllegisCyber, an early-stage cybersecurity venture firm, and a founder of DataTribe, a cybersecurity startup “studio” in metropolitan Washington, D.C.

As the new year begins gaining steam, there is ostensibly a piece of good news on the cyber front. Major cyber attacks have been in a lull in recent months and still are.

The good tidings are fleeting, however. Attacks typically come in waves. The next one is due, and 2019 will be the worst year yet — a sad reality as companies increasingly pursue digitization to drive efficiency and simultaneously move into the “target zone” of cyberattacks.

This bad news is compounded by the harsh reality that there are not nearly enough cybersecurity pros to properly respond to all the threats.

The technology industry has never seen anything quite like it. Seasoned cyber pros typically earn $95,000 a year, often markedly more, and yet job openings can linger almost indefinitely. The ever-leaner cybersecurity workforce makes many companies desperate for help.

Between September 2017 and August 2018, U.S. employers posted nearly 314,000 jobs for cybersecurity pros. If they could be filled, that would boost the country’s current cyber workforce of 714,000 by more than 40%, according to the National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education. In light of the need, this is still the equivalent of pocket change.

Towfiqu Photography via Getty Images

Global Gap of Nearly 3 Million Cybersecurity Positions

In a recent study, (ISC)2 – the world’s largest nonprofit association of certified cybersecurity pros – said there is now a gap of almost 3 million cybersecurity jobs globally – substantially more than other experts said might be the case years into the future.

Companies are trying to cope in part by relying more aggressively on artificial intelligence and machine learning, but this is still at a relatively nascent stage and can never do more than mitigate the problem. Big companies have their hands full, and it’s even worse for smaller enterprises. They’re attacked more — sometimes as a conduit to their larger business partners – because their defenses are weaker.

So what kind of cyber talent are companies and government entities looking for?

Preferably, they want people with a bachelor’s degree in programming, computer science or computer engineering. They also warm up to an academic background replete with courses in statistics and math. They want cybersecurity certifications as well, and, of course, experience in specialties plagued by staffing shortages, such as intrusion detection, secure software development and network monitoring.

These are ideal candidates, but, in fact, the backgrounds of budding cyber pros need not be nearly this good.

Only Recently Has Formal Training Existed

Cybersecurity has long been a field that has embraced people with nontraditional backgrounds. Almost no cybersecurity pro over 30 today has a degree in cybersecurity and many don’t even have degrees in computer science. Professionals need some training to become familiar with select tools and technologies – usually at a community college or boot camp — but even more they need curiosity, knowledge of the current threat landscape and a strong passion for learning and research. Particularly strong candidates have backgrounds as programmers, systems administrators and network engineers.

Asking too much from prospective pros isn’t the only reason behind the severe cyber manpower shortage. In general, corporations do too little to help their cyber staffs stay technically current and even less when it comes to helping their IT staffs  pitch in.

(ISC) 2 formalized a study of more than 3,300 IT professionals less than 18 months ago and learned that organizations aren’t doing enough to properly equip and power their IT staffs with the education and authority to bolster their implementation of security technologies.

Inadequate Corporate Cyber Training

One key finding was that 43% of those polled said their organization provides inadequate security training resources, heightening the possibility of a breach.

Universities suffer shortcoming as well. Roughly 85 of them offer undergraduate and/or graduate degrees in cybersecurity. There is a big catch, however.  Far more diversified computer science programs, which attract substantially more students, don’t mandate even one cybersecurity course.

Fortunately, positive developments are popping up on other fronts. Select states have begun taking steps to help organizations and individuals alleviate a talent shortage by building information sharing hubs for local businesses, government and academia — all revolving around workforce development.

Georgia recently invested more than $100 million in a new cybersecurity center. A similar facility in Colorado, among other things, is working with area colleges and universities on educational programs for using the next generation of technology. Other states have begun following in their wake.

On another front, there is discussion about a Cybersecurity Peace Corps. The model would be similar to the original Peace Corps but specific to nascent cybersecurity jobs. The proposed program — which would require an act of Congress and does not yet exist — would place interested workers with nonprofits and other organizations that could not otherwise afford them and pay for their salaries and training.

Cyber Boot Camps and Community College Programs

Much further along are cyber boot camps and community college cybersecurity programs. The boot camps accept non-programmers, train them in key skills and help them land jobs. Established boot camps that have placed graduates in cyber jobs include Securest Academy in Denver, Open Cloud Academy in San Antonio and Evolve Security Academy in Chicago.

There are also more than a dozen two-year college cybersecurity programs scattered across the country. A hybrid between a boot camp and community college program is the City Colleges of Chicago (CCC), which partners with the Department of Defense on a free cybersecurity training program for active military service members.

A small handful of technology giants have also stepped into the fray. IBM, for example, creates what it calls “new collar” jobs, which prioritize skills, knowledge and willingness to learn over degrees. Workers pick up their skills through on-the-job training, industry certifications and community college courses and represent 20% of Big Blue cybersecurity hires since 2015.

Technology companies still must work much harder to broaden their range of potential candidates, seeking smart, motivated and dedicated individuals who would be good teammates. They can learn on the job, without degrees or certificates, and eventually fit in well. You can quibble with how much time, energy and work this might take. It’s clear, however, that there is no truly viable alternative.

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https://techcrunch.com/2019/01/27/too-few-cybersecurity-professionals-is-a-gigantic-problem-for-2019/

Etsy error resulted in large amounts being withdrawn from some sellers’ bank accounts and credit cards

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An Etsy bill payment error resulted in large amounts of money being withdrawn from several sellers’ bank accounts and credit cards on Friday morning. While the company says the issue has been resolved and was not the result of fraud, the headache isn’t over for affected sellers because Monday is a federal holiday in the United States, and many financial institutions are closed.

Etsy sellers are required to have a valid credit or debit card on file with Etsy in order to have a payment account. Boing Boing reports that complaints first began emerging in Etsy’s Community Forums and Twitter on Friday morning, when sellers began noticing amounts ranging from hundreds to tens of thousands of dollars had ben withdrawn or charged to those accounts.

An Etsy representative posted with a brief message in its forum stating that the company was “aware of a bill payment error affecting a small group of sellers which resulted in some cards being incorrectly charged.” Then on Sunday afternoon, Etsy sent a longer explanation to sellers. The company said it has already refunded all incorrectly charged cards and will be sending deposits on Tuesday.

“An update on recent issues affecting payment accounts

On Friday, February 15, a bill payment error affected a small group of sellers which resulted in some cards being incorrectly charged. Sellers who were affected have been notified by email, or by Etsy Conversations, and the issue that caused this has since been resolved.

As part of fixing this issue, all incorrectly charged cards have been refunded. It may take several business days for the refunded amounts to clear and settle in card accounts.  Also related to fixing the root problem, some sellers saw their scheduled deposit of funds returned to Etsy on Friday, February 15, and those deposits will now be sent on Tuesday, February 19.

For affected sellers, we are very sorry for the trouble or concern this may have caused. Our first priority has been to correct the issue. This was not a fraud issue, but instead an error related to a site change which affects a small group of sellers and is unrelated to buyers’ purchases.

This is an issue we do not take lightly. We’ve assembled a Payments task force, including senior executives across Etsy, to address any concerns or troubles resulting from this error. We will refund any undue fees associated with this incorrect charge and change in deposit schedule. We don’t expect this error to impact additional sellers going forward.”

The explanation was not enough for many sellers, who said hourly updates should have been posted for a problem of this magnitude, and that Etsy had not addressed how it will compensate them for overdraft or late fees, or if the returned deposits will appear on their 1099s. TechCrunch has contacted Etsy for comment.

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http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/sCCZCHjQenc/

We’re all second-screening. Here’s how you’re doing it wrong.

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Second-screening — watching TV while also looking at your phone, tablet or laptop — is probably the  most widely adopted destructive behavior of the decade. We keep hearing that it’s bad for us; we keep doing it regardless. It’s the smoking of the 2010s. 

Psychologists were sounding the alarm as early as 2012 that this kind of screen-based multitasking seemed to be correlated with depression and anxiety. Did we listen? Did we hell. Back then, according to Nielsen, a mere (!) 40 percent of American adults looked at their phones or tablets every day while parked in front of the tube. By 2017, according to eMarketer, that number had climbed to over 70 percentRead more…

More about Second Screen, Culture, and Web Culture

https://mashable.com/article/second-screening/

5 GHz Wi-Fi Isn’t Always Better Than 2.4 GHz Wi-Fi

Wireless router and kids using a laptop in homeCasezy idea/Shutterstock.com

Are you having trouble with your Wi-Fi connection? Try using 2.4 GHz instead of 5 GHz. Sure, 5 GHz Wi-Fi is newer, faster, and less congested—but it has a weakness. 2.4 GHz is better at covering large areas and penetrating through solid objects.

5 GHz vs. 2.4 GHz: What’s the Difference?

Wi-Fi can run on two different “bands” of radio frequency: 5 GHz and 2.4 GHz. 5 GHz Wi-Fi went mainstream with 802.11n—now known as Wi-Fi 4—which was introduced back in 2009. Before that, Wi-Fi was largely 2.4 GHz.

This was a big upgrade! 5 GHz uses shorter radio waves, and that provides faster speeds. WiGig takes this further and operates on the 60 GHz band. That means even shorter radio waves, resulting in even faster speeds over a much smaller distance.

There’s also much less congestion with 5 GHz. That means a more solid, reliable wireless connection, especially in dense areas with a lot of networks and devices. Traditional cordless telephones and wireless baby monitors also operate on 2.4 GHz. That means they only interfere with 2.4 GHz Wi-Fi—not 5 GHz Wi-Fi.

In summary, 5 GHz is faster and provides a more reliable connection. It’s the newer technology, and it’s tempting to use 5 GHz all the time and write off 2.4 GHz Wi-Fi. But 5 GHz Wi-Fi’s shorter radio waves mean it can cover less distance and isn’t at good as penetrating through solid objects as 2.4 GHz Wi-Fi is. In other words, 2.4 GHz can cover a larger area and is better at getting through walls.

RELATED: What’s the Difference Between 2.4 and 5-Ghz Wi-Fi (and Which Should I Use)?

You Can Use Both With One Router

Modern routers are generally “dual-band” routers and can simultaneously operate separate Wi-Fi networks on the 5 GHz and 2.4 GHz frequencies. Some are “tri-band routers” that can provide a 2.4 GHz signal along with two separate 5 GHz signals for less congestion among Wi-Fi devices operating on 5 GHz.

This isn’t just a compatibility feature for old devices that only support 2.4 GHz Wi-Fi. There are times you’ll want 2.4 GHz Wi-Fi even with a modern device that supports 5 GHz.

Routers can be configured in one of two ways: They can hide the difference between the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz networks or expose it. It all depends on how you name the two separate Wi-Fi networks.

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https://www.howtogeek.com/405105/5ghz-wi-fi-isnt-always-better-than-2.4ghz-wi-fi/

New Apple rumor is every fan’s dream come true

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Apple will launch a ton of new gear this year, a new report claims. And some of it has been on our wish list for a long, long time. 

Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, known for his accurate predictions, has laid out Apple’s hardware plans for the year in a huge note (via MacRumors), and they include a fresh size for the MacBook Pro, new iPads, and a huge, lust-worthy new monitor. 

According to Kuo, Apple plans to launch a MacBook Pro with a 16-inch to 16.5-inch display with an “all-new” design. He offers no other details, but with that screen size, it’s likely to sit atop of the company’s laptop lineup (the 17-inch Pro was discontinued in 2012). Apple is often criticized for turning its MacBook Pro into a laptop aimed at the general populace instead of professionals; perhaps this new, larger variant will be the pro’s Pro with top specs and (fingers crossed) more ports. Read more…

More about Apple, Iphone, Ipad, Macbook Pro, and Airpods

https://mashable.com/article/apple-hardware-2019/