Is it time to upgrade?

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Is it time to upgrade? This is probably the most frequent question I get from my clients. And for good reason. It’s not always easy to tell if upgrading makes sense. Not even for IT Pros. The reason is simple. It’s complicated. There are a lot of factors which have to be considered when deciding to upgrade, and there are many questions you should ask yourself when planning for your future IT needs.

The first thing to consider when evaluating an upgrade is Cost. But even cost is more complex than you might think.

How much does it cost now? What is the cost of support/maintenance over the life of the product? How long should I expect it to last?
What about the costs of lost productivity if I DON’T upgrade?

What about less tangible costs related issues:

  • incompatibility between versions
  • poor performance of older versions
  • security issues due to reduced/absent vendor support
  • increased support/maintenance costs – older stuff takes more time to keep running

Besides costs, there are also risks. The risk of failure increases with the age of any product. Older stuff breaks. Bottom line.

Besides risk of failure, there are also security risks, especially when we’re talking about software. Older software & hardware drivers are updated less frequently than current versions. Really old software that is out of support may not be updated at all, which can be a problem due to both security and reliability concerns. Some older software may not work properly on newer operating systems, and can pose a risk of data loss due to crashes. Suffice to say you are taking a big risk by using unsupported products on your network. Bottom Line: If you can afford not to, don’t.

Sometimes the question of upgrading is simpler because you might HAVE to upgrade. Forced upgrades are commonplace, and although you may not actually be “Forced”, once you’ve built your company procedures around a piece of technology, you cant always just switch and stop using it.

After technology has been deployed across your business, change can become expensive. Vendors know this, and they’ve learned that most companies will choose to upgrade rather than change software that everyone in the company uses. But even though the costs to deploy a new solution and provide training are more expensive than the upgrade, if your business depends on numerous programs, the cost of upgrades can quickly become a multi-headed monster…one that feeds itself.

The typical scenario goes something like this:

You have to upgrade to the current version of Quickbooks because their payroll feature is no longer supported on the older versions. The new version of Quickbooks won’t run on Windows XP, so now you have to upgrade all of your Quickbooks workstations to Windows 7. Your time keeping program won’t run on Windows 7, so you now have to upgrade that program too, but of course the new version won’t run on Windows XP, so you the rest of the PCs on your network now need to be updated to Windows 7.

Next, you find out that your older version of Office 2003 is crashing due to incompatibilities with some of the newer software as well, so now you also need to update to Office 2013. File format changes between Office versions mean the Office 2013 upgrade needs to be deployed companywide to keep everyone on the same version.

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So you bite the bullet and start upgrading to Windows 7 and Office 2013, in addition to Quickbooks. You buy some new PCs, and upgrade some others hoping to get a few more years out of them. Several $1000s into the upgrade process, someone points out that the older workstations, to which you already upgraded with more RAM and larger drives to allow the OS upgrade, are now being brought to their knees by the resource hungry newer versions of software.

Oh yeah, and two of your printers (you know, the ones you’ve had for years, that print perfectly and that you have 2+ year’s worth of toner for) are no longer supported under Windows 7.

So before you know it you’ve replaced all of the PCs on your network, upgraded all of the major software packages, and replaced a couple of printers that didn’t need replacing. Worse yet, you’ve also just set yourself up to repeat the process about 5-7 years from now.

By the time all is said and done, the whole Upgrade question can get pretty confusing. Figuring out what to upgrade can be a daunting task, and without proper planning the expense and risks only increase.

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So what do you do? Here are some guidelines.

  • Keep all software up to date with regular security patches and updates.
    • Most major vendors offer frequent software and firmware updates.
    • Out of date software escalates risks.
    • Windows Updates and Service packs ensure security and productivity
    • Productivity apps that are used frequently business-wide, represent the greatest risk of failure or security breach, and must be kept current .
  • When version upgrades are required, plan to upgrade ALL PCs at once
    • When all systems are on the same versions, ensured compatibility means better productivity
    • Support costs are reduced when software platforms are uniform across your business
  • Don’t run unsupported software.
    • If the vendor is no longer updating the older version, upgrade to the new version.
    • If the vendor is no longer offering upgrades, consider an alternative product/vendor.
  • Avoid upgrading Operating systems by instead replacing PCs.
    • OS Upgrades are costly.
      • Purchase price of software license
      • Cost of support to backup system, install upgrade and resolve issues
      • Cost of hardware upgrades to meet OS requirements and ensure performance
        • RAM/Hard drive Upgrades
        • Peripheral upgrades
      • Reduced productivity: diminished performance resultant to pairing last generation hardware with upgraded OS
    • Unless you have 25+ PCs, purchasing PCs with OS license is cost effective comparable to Enterprise Licensing
      • Preinstalled OS saves setup time
      • OEM licenses are much cheaper than a retail license for Windows
  • PLAN. PLAN. PLAN.
    • Budgets are your friends.
      • When purchasing a new PC, consider the anticipated useful life
      • Develop a schedule to replace ALL PCs regularly that meets your budget
    • Choose wisely.
      • Choose Vendors for Warranty and Support as well as features and price
      • Avoid Custom software and hardware solutions if possible
        • Custom software can be a nightmare to maintain, and vendor support may vary.
        • Custom vendor support contracts can be expensive, and the hardware/software may become unusable without support. Third party support may be difficult/impossible to find.
        • What happens if your developer/system builder goes out of business?
    • Develop a long term plan for the ongoing replacement of all IT equipment
      • Waiting until everything is really old can be a disaster.
      • Generally, a 4-7 year rotation schedule is appropriate for most IT equipment
      • Version consistency for Operating Systems /Software = reduced support costs and increased productivity

So what now?

As you may have heard, support for Windows XP officially ended earlier this year. So, should you update those Windows XP computers now? Or replace them?

Well, I know your old Windows XP pcs have already been replaced/upgraded, right? I’m sure you are NOT wondering how big a risk it might be to put off the upgrade awhile. I mean, if Microsoft says you need to buy 20 new PCs this year, you’re just gonna do it, right? You don’t want to piss of the MotherShip in Redmond now, do you?

Well, let’s say you DON’T have an unlimited IT budget…You probably have some tough choices to make.

          

To help put the question in perspective, ask yourself these questions if you are debating about the XP upgrade:

  • Do you run any HIPPA compliant software or keep sensitive data on your networks? – YES, UPGRADE
  • Do you process credit cards, work with financial data, or pay bills online? – YES, UPGRADE
  • Do you make purchases or use Internet Banking? – YES, UPGRADE
  • Is Internet Explorer 9 or greater required for any websites you use frequently? – YES, UPGRADE
  • Is your system slow and it seems like you are always waiting for it to catch up? – YES, UPGRADE
  • Do you use Internet Explorer to surf the Internet? – Switch to Chrome or Firefox or UPGRADE
  • Is any of your CURRENT software UNSUPPORTED on Windows 7? – YES, EVALUATE. Additional software upgrades may be required.
  • Are all of your printers and peripherals compatible with the new software? – YES, UPGRADE; NO, Evaluate extra costs.
  • Will the upgrade cause any other problems? -YES, Evaluate. Obviously, every situation is different.

Still don’t know what to do? Let us evaluate your situation and help you figure it out.  That’s what we do best.

Proactive Computing – Intelligent IT Solutions and Support.

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Keyboard shortcuts for Windows

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Ever wish you could remember all of those Windows shortcuts?

Well, here they are all in one place.

Some of these actually date back to well before Windows, the days DOS, of text of green on jet black screens. Sorry. I guess I was waxing a wee bit nostalgic for the bad old days of computing.  Anyway, here’s the source link to the Microsoft support article, and all the Windows shortcuts are right here:

Windows system key combinations

  • F1: Help
  • CTRL+ESC: Open Start menu
  • ALT+TAB: Switch between open programs
  • ALT+F4: Quit program
  • SHIFT+DELETE: Delete item permanently
  • Windows Logo+L: Lock the computer (without using CTRL+ALT+DELETE)

Windows program key combinations

  • CTRL+C: Copy
  • CTRL+X: Cut
  • CTRL+V: Paste
  • CTRL+Z: Undo
  • CTRL+B: Bold
  • CTRL+U: Underline
  • CTRL+I: Italic

Mouse click/keyboard modifier combinations for shell objects

  • SHIFT+right click: Displays a shortcut menu containing alternative commands
  • SHIFT+double click: Runs the alternate default command (the second item on the menu)
  • ALT+double click: Displays properties
  • SHIFT+DELETE: Deletes an item immediately without placing it in the Recycle Bin

General keyboard-only commands

  • F1: Starts Windows Help
  • F10: Activates menu bar options
  • SHIFT+F10 Opens a shortcut menu for the selected item (this is the same as right-clicking an object
  • CTRL+ESC: Opens the Start menu (use the ARROW keys to select an item)
  • CTRL+ESC or ESC: Selects the Start button (press TAB to select the taskbar, or press SHIFT+F10 for a context menu)
  • CTRL+SHIFT+ESC: Opens Windows Task Manager
  • ALT+DOWN ARROW: Opens a drop-down list box
  • ALT+TAB: Switch to another running program (hold down the ALT key and then press the TAB key to view the task-switching window)
  • SHIFT: Press and hold down the SHIFT key while you insert a CD-ROM to bypass the automatic-run feature
  • ALT+SPACE: Displays the main window’s System menu (from the System menu, you can restore, move, resize, minimize, maximize, or close the window)
  • ALT+- (ALT+hyphen): Displays the Multiple Document Interface (MDI) child window’s System menu (from the MDI child window’s System menu, you can restore, move, resize, minimize, maximize, or close the child window)
  • CTRL+TAB: Switch to the next child window of a Multiple Document Interface (MDI) program
  • ALT+underlined letter in menu: Opens the menu
  • ALT+F4: Closes the current window
  • CTRL+F4: Closes the current Multiple Document Interface (MDI) window
  • ALT+F6: Switch between multiple windows in the same program (for example, when the Notepad Find dialog box is displayed, ALT+F6 switches between the Find dialog box and the main Notepad window)

Shell objects and general folder/Windows Explorer shortcuts

For a selected object:

  • F2: Rename object
  • F3: Find all files
  • CTRL+X: Cut
  • CTRL+C: Copy
  • CTRL+V: Paste
  • SHIFT+DELETE: Delete selection immediately, without moving the item to the Recycle Bin
  • ALT+ENTER: Open the properties for the selected object

To copy a file

Press and hold down the CTRL key while you drag the file to another folder.

To create a shortcut

Press and hold down CTRL+SHIFT while you drag a file to the desktop or a folder.

General folder/shortcut control

  • F4: Selects the Go To A Different Folder box and moves down the entries in the box (if the toolbar is active in Windows Explorer)
  • F5: Refreshes the current window.
  • F6: Moves among panes in Windows Explorer
  • CTRL+G: Opens the Go To Folder tool (in Windows 95 Windows Explorer only)
  • CTRL+Z: Undo the last command
  • CTRL+A: Select all the items in the current window
  • BACKSPACE: Switch to the parent folder
  • SHIFT+click+Close button: For folders, close the current folder plus all parent folders

Windows Explorer tree control

  • Numeric Keypad *: Expands everything under the current selection
  • Numeric Keypad +: Expands the current selection
  • Numeric Keypad -: Collapses the current selection.
  • RIGHT ARROW: Expands the current selection if it is not expanded, otherwise goes to the first child
  • LEFT ARROW: Collapses the current selection if it is expanded, otherwise goes to the parent

Properties control

  • CTRL+TAB/CTRL+SHIFT+TAB: Move through the property tabs

Accessibility shortcuts

  • Press SHIFT five times: Toggles StickyKeys on and off
  • Press down and hold the right SHIFT key for eight seconds: Toggles FilterKeys on and off
  • Press down and hold the NUM LOCK key for five seconds: Toggles ToggleKeys on and off
  • Left ALT+left SHIFT+NUM LOCK: Toggles MouseKeys on and off
  • Left ALT+left SHIFT+PRINT SCREEN: Toggles high contrast on and off

Dialog box keyboard commands

  • TAB: Move to the next control in the dialog box
  • SHIFT+TAB: Move to the previous control in the dialog box
  • SPACEBAR: If the current control is a button, this clicks the button. If the current control is a check box, this toggles the check box. If the current control is an option, this selects the option.
  • ENTER: Equivalent to clicking the selected button (the button with the outline)
  • ESC: Equivalent to clicking the Cancel button
  • ALT+underlined letter in dialog box item: Move to the corresponding item

via Keyboard shortcuts for Windows.

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Chrome App Launcher – All Shortcuts in One Place

It’s no secret around here that Chrome is our browser of choice, and has been for a long time. There are so many great reasons we stick with Google’s browser that we’d need to dedicate an entire article on the virtues of Chrome vs. anything else. Trust me when I say it wouldn’t be a quick read.

The built-in sync process in Chrome for example, which seamlessly keeps all your devices’ browsers current with your latest bookmarks, history and settings…across all  devices and desktop/mobile platforms…is enough to win me over all by itself.  But one of the coolest features in the Chrome browser is the App store, and the ability to add apps to your home page etc., making it really convenient to access things like Tweetdeck, Evernote, Skype, Facebook, Netflix…you name it…as well as shortcuts to Maps , GMail or just about anything. There are literally tons of apps, many of them both free AND useful, in the Chrome App store.

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Google Chrome apps blur the lines between actual apps and shortcuts to web pages. Some are true apps, while others are a convenient shortcut to regular web content like GMail or Maps. Either way, the launch page makes it easy to create and customize your own personalized launcher with all of your favorite apps and websites in one place.

Chrome App Launcher takes it one step further, by giving you an “Apps” shortcut right on your toolbar, as well as the ability to set the Apps page as your Home page. My favorite feature is the ability to add the Apps shortcut to your Windows Taskbar, making most of my Chrome shortcuts just 2 clicks away.

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You can create a shortcut on your Windows Task Bar really easily. Well, actually all you have to do is install any Desktop App from the Chrome App Store, and Google automatically adds a shortcut on your Task Bar (and Start Menu, inside the Google Chrome folder) for you! The instructions are right below.

Visit the Chrome App store right after you install Chrome (if you haven’t already) and check out all of the free (and not so free) apps available that help make the Chrome experience our ongoing recommendation for trouble free, high performance browsing.

Of course, keep checking back here for more tips on how to make IT get out of your way and start working for you instead!

App Launcher

The Chrome App Launcher is a window where you can quickly access all of your Chrome apps right from your desktop. You can open App Launcher from your Taskbar (Windows) or Dock (Mac).

Install App Launcher

App Launcher installs automatically when you add an app from the “For Your Desktop” collection of the Chrome Web Store. Here’s how it works:

  1. Go to the For Your Desktop section of the Chrome Web Store.
  2. Add an app by clicking the Free or Buy for [price] button.
  3. Look in your taskbar (Windows) or Dock (Mac) to find App Launcher .

When you open App Launcher, you’ll find the app you just added, as well as some other handy Chrome apps.

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5 Ways to Create a Password You Can Remember – wikiHow

5 Ways to Create a Password You Can Remember – wikiHow.

Coming up with a password that is both safe and memorable gets harder and harder the more of them we have to memorize. Combining words, phrases, numbers, and coding them with simple substitutions will ensure that your personal information is safe. It is important to be able to come up with passwords that are personal enough to remember but varied and complex enough to be secure, so learning how to create appropriate passwords is a crucial skill that you will undoubtedly use often.

Read more on WikiHow.com

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Groundskeeper Willie Makes Plea for Scottish Independence [VIDEO]

Groundskeeper Willie of ‘The Simpsons’ Makes Plea for Scottish Independence [VIDEO].

Listen up, people of Scotland: Groundskeeper Willie has some political advice for you.

Aye Or Die

Groundskeeper Willie – The Simpsons

The beloved Simpsons character is taking a stand in a video recently released by Fox, saying he is pro-independence. Scotland will be voting on Sept. 18 to decide if the country will separate from the United Kingdom.

In the video, the kilt-wearing Springfield Elementary School janitor makes a case for independence, touting the country’s oil reserves and whiskey-making capabilities.

“Scotland is the home to two-thirds of Europe’s oil reserves,” Willie says. “Notice how in no country rich in oil does a man wear pants. We also make a fine damn whiskey. And we spell whiskey right, too!” (Scots prefer spelling it “whisky.”)

He even volunteers himself to lead the potentially newly independent country, instead of “safe choice” Alex Salmond: “Willie won’t back down to world leaders because I haven’t a clue who they are, and I’m not willin’ to learn!”

Sounds like the ideal candidate. Willie, if things don’t work out in Scotland, we hear Toronto is looking for a new mayor…

The 26th season of The Simpsons premieres on Sept. 28.

BONUS: 5 ‘Simpsons’ Facts You Might Not D’oh!

 

 

 

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What to Do If You’ve Been Hacked|Re/code

What to Do If You’ve Been Hacked (and How to Prevent It) | Re/code.

 by Bonnie Cha  re/code

The recent celebrity hacking incident and Home Depot data breach may have you worried about your online security, and rightly so. As we bring more aspects of our lives online – social, shopping, banking, storage — the risks of cyber crime increase. But there are ways you can better protect yourself.

In this guide, I’ll outline some steps you can take to safeguard your various Web accounts and devices. The recommendations come from several Internet security experts I spoke with, including Laura Iwan, senior vice president of programs at the Center for Internet Security, Sean Sullivan, security advisor at F-Secure (an anti-virus and online security solution provider), and Timo Hiroven, senior researcher at F-Secure. There are also tips on how to detect if you’ve been hacked and what to do about it.

De-fense! De-fense!

There are numerous precautions that you can take in order to protect yourself from hackers. One of the easiest and most simple ways is to create strong, unique passwords for every one of your accounts. Yet, most people don’t.

While it’s tempting to use something like your child’s name and birthday because it’s easier to remember, creating a password with a random mix of upper- and lower-case letters, numbers and characters will be harder to crack.

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There are password apps like LastPass and 1Password that can help you with this by generating strong passcodes for each of your accounts. Plus, they’ll keep track of them all. When choosing such a program, Iwan recommends that you look for one that uses an industry-accepted standard for encryption like AES (Advanced Encryption Standard), and one that stores your passwords locally on your computer, rather than in the cloud.

Another safety measure you should take is to enable two-factor authentication when available. Two-factor authentication requires a user to provide an extra form of identification beyond just your login ID and password. This may be a special PIN code that’s sent to your phone, a physical token like a key fob or your fingerprint.

Two-factor authentication isn’t impervious to attacks, but it does add an extra layer of protection. Many popular Web services, including GmailMicrosoftAppleTwitter,Facebook, and Dropbox offer two-factor authentication, so take the extra few minutes to turn it on.

Next, be suspicious of emails asking for personal information. A lot of hackers use a method called phishing that aims to gather sensitive data from you by sending an email that looks like its from a legitimate entity like your bank or credit card company. Some signs of a scam might be requests for immediate action, spelling and grammar mistakes, and suspicious links. Do not respond to these. Instead, call up the institution that supposedly sent the email and confirm if it’s legit or alert them to the issue.

Also, it should go without saying but in general, don’t click on suspicious links or browse unsafe website. Only install applications that come from trusted, well-known sources. And be sure that the operating system and apps on your computers and mobile devices are updated with the latest versions and patches.

Here are some more specific tips for different Internet activities:

Email and social accounts
• Think twice about what you post to your social networks, and monitor what others are posting about you. There’s a chance that hackers might use your social profile pages to gather personal information about you and try to guess your password or answers to your secret question.
• Related to that, check your account’s privacy settings to make sure you’re only sharing information with your friends and not the public.
• Sullivan also recommends creating separate email addresses for your personal communication and everything else. For example, you might use a throwaway email address for news websites that you make you register with a user name and password, or retailers who want to send you coupons.

Cloud accounts
• If you back up your files to the cloud, remember that even though you delete them on your computer or mobile device, they’re still stored in your cloud account. To completely delete the file, you’ll also need to remove it from your backup cloud account.

Online transactions
• Don’t use public computers or public Wi-Fi networks to make any transactions. The machines might contain malicious software that can collect your credit card information, and criminals could also be monitoring public Wi-Fi networks for similar information.

Web browsing
• Don’t respond to pop-up windows.
• Secure your home Wi-Fi network using WPA-2 with AES encryption settings. There’s a good tutorial on how to do that here.
• Set your Web browser to auto-update to ensure that you’re running the most current version.

Know the signs

How do you if you’ve been hacked? There may be some obvious signs. For example, you may start getting emails from your friends saying they received a strange message from your email account. Or your bank or credit card company might call you about some suspicious activity on your account. If you installed a mobile app with malware on your smartphone, you might find some unauthorized charges on your phone bill.

Hacked Screen

There are other, more subtle indicators. You may find new toolbars installed on your Web browser, or new software on your computer. Your computer may also start behaving strangely or slow to a crawl.

These are all signs that you might have been hacked.

I’ve been hacked. Now what?

If you have been hacked, the first thing you should do is reset your passwords. Iwan recommends starting with your email account, followed by your financial and other critical accounts. This is because password resets for all your other accounts are typically sent to your email.

If you’re locked out of your account or blocked from accessing it, many Web services have steps in place so you can get back in. For example, Facebook has a system where you can use a trusted source like a friend to take back your account. Search each service’s help section for specific instructions.

Speaking of friends, you should let your contacts know that you’ve been hacked, and report the issue to the site. Also, run a scan of your computer or mobile device using a trusted and up-to-date anti-virus program.

In the case of identity theft, order a copy of your credit reports and file an initial fraud alert with the three major credit bureaus: Equifax, Experian and TransUnion. Contact your local police and report the identity theft, and request new cards from your bank and credit card companies. You also continue to monitor your monthly statements for any more unusual activity.

Unfortunately, there’s no way to completely eliminate the risk of hack attacks and other cyber crimes. But by taking some safeguards and arming yourself with the knowledge of what actions to take in the event of an attack, you can help better protect yourself and minimize damage.

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E Pluribus Unum Gone Digital – Wired

E Pluribus Unum Gone Digital: Connected Software Is the Next Step in Productivity | Innovation Insights | WIRED.

Starbucks as workplace: How’s your work-life balance in the mobile age?  Global X/Flickr

E Pluribus Unum Gone Digital: Connected Software Is the Next Step in Productivity | Innovation Insights | via WIRED

Google. Evernote. Wunderlist. Mailbox. Dropbox. GoToMeeting. The newest wave of apps is all about leveraging the right tools to help you get things done across multi-screen. This proliferation of mobile technology has promised liberation for today’s workforce. So why do we feel more chained to our work than ever?

Nearly 1.3 billion (yes, billion) people now work untethered from their desks, and organizations are getting serious about keeping this new distributed workforce connected and productive with tools that support with mobility and collaboration.

The arrival of the mobile workforce has given many entrepreneurs the hope that they will be able to find some time for life outside of work. But with time as the ultimate commodity in today’s increasingly busy world, the work-life balance that many seek is still more of an illusion than reality.

We should be at a point where we can spend our Sunday afternoon playing catch with our kids, instead of wasting hours sifting through emails to get a handle on where our business stands. Or have time to go out and meet with prospective clients and make deals that will grow our business, instead of being bogged down and overwhelmed while pulling all of the pieces together.

So why is this still a problem in a time when we have more productivity tools and technologies than ever before? Because all of our tools are entirely disconnected, and its contributing to our ever more fragmented workflows. We’ve put too much of an emphasis on our email as a productivity tool, with the hopes that new productivity management and content sharing tools from Google Docs to Asana will pick up the slack where email fails.

But that’s not happening. Workers are still spending 28% of their office time on emails daily, which amounts to more than 650 hours a year and 13 hours a week.

Microsoft, Apple and Google have tried to solve this information overload, with more than half of the workforce stating that they are demoralized when they can’t manage all the information that comes their way each day, but have ultimately failed to create a solution that enables everyone, from the small business owner to the corporate manager, to get their work done faster and more efficiently.
The tools that we turn to for personal productivity have made the shift from web to multi-screen and while they are useful, they are not transformative. Why? Because they are all great at doing one thing — but don’t talk to each other.

Ultimately, we’ve gotten away from the simplicity of work. No one should have to open 5-6 different tools, email, Google Docs, GoToMeeting, Dropbox, Basecamp, Evernote and the myriad of other tools we use, in order to get an update on just one project. All of these tools have become somewhat counterproductive as only 2 percent of us can actually multitask between all of them and because more than 50% of us are now spending more time trying to be productive than actually working.

In trying to make things simpler we’ve only diminished productivity, which combined with wasted time, negatively affects the bottom line.

So how do we solve this snowballing productivity problem? We need all of these software tools to work together as one, creating a digital E Pluribus Unum.

By approaching the productivity problem from a position of connectivity, our workflow immediately becomes more efficient because our tools are working for us, and doing the information sifting and organizing so that we don’t have to.

For example, CEOs should not be copied so often that they have 300 emails coming through their inbox each day. This system makes email another job that managers don’t have time for, and ultimately defeats the purpose of email as a tool for communication.

However, if email, project management, meetings, documents, notes, etc. are all unified in one place, CEOs can utilize the time they used to spend searching for the latest email update to actually get something done.

Working on the go can also be as productive as working at your desk if you’re able to access apps in a single connected place that doesn’t require opening and closing different programs constantly in order to complete one task on a phone or tablet. At the end of the day, everyone needs to be able to see it all at a glance when out of the office, whether we’re at the kitchen table or on the train.

Technology has helped us break the chains and free ourselves from being stuck at a desk all day, and now its time to keep track of what really matters when it comes to working efficiently — context and clarity.

We have realized how fragmented and disconnected our workflows have become, now its time to reconnect.

Steven Berlin is co-founder and CEO of Uskape.

Originally posted by:

Related articles across the web

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5 Million Gmail Passwords Leaked, Check Yours Now

5 Million Gmail Passwords Leaked, Check Yours Now.

5 Million Gmail Passwords Leaked, Check Yours Now

5 Million Gmail Passwords Leaked, Check Yours Now

According to the Daily Dot, nearly 5 million usernames and passwords to Gmail accounts have been leaked on a Russian Bitcoin forum. Here’s what you should know.

The list has since been taken down, and there’s no evidence that Gmail itself was hacked—just that these passwords have been leaked. Most sources are saying that lots of the information is quite old, so chances are they were leaked long ago—though others are claiming 60% of the passwords are still valid (not to mention really, really horrible).

5 Million Gmail Passwords Leaked, Check Yours Now

To check if your password was one of the leaked, plug your Gmail address into this tool (which also checks against recent Yandex and Mail.ru leaks). If you’re paranoid, you may also want to change your password at this time. As always, make sure you use a strong password and enable two-factor authentication on your account. Hit the link to read more.

Update: Looks like the IsLeaked tool is having some trouble due to unusually high traffic—if you get an error message, try reloading the page or checking back later.

5 Million Gmail Passwords Leaked to Russian Bitcoin Forum | The Daily Dot

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